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BikeNomads Annual Meet 2014 – Tarkarli

It was that time of the year when I was eagerly waiting for the BikeNomads Annual Meet 2014 location and dates to be announced. After a lot of bickering on various locations, Tarkarli was the decided as this year’s Annual Meet location. The dates 7th, 8th & 9th of November, 2014 were confirmed and the plans started rolling out. It was around 700 kms from Bangalore.

My biggest dilemma was arranging a bike, as mine got stolen around 6 months back 😦 . I went ahead and registered anyway, the mantra being that I would beg, borrow or steal rent a bike.

A little about Tarkarli. It is a small fishing settlement south of Malvan, in the Sindhudurg district of Maharashtra, India. What makes this place interesting is that this village is located at the confluence of River Karli and the Arabian Sea. The river curves south right before it meets the sea, the estuary forms a narrow piece of land barely half a kilometer wide. The hotel we had been booked at was right in the center of this piece of land flanked by the river and the sea on both sides. You can see what I mean in the map below.Tarkarli

As the D Day got closer six of us confirmed our registrations and plans started falling into place. The final six from Bangalore were Rajan, Diwakar, Vivek, Sushant, Poornima and of course, me. Rajan, Diwakar and Vivek planned to leave one day in advance as they wanted to take a halt in Goa. Sushant and I on the other hand were leaving early morning on the 7th planning to reach Tarkarli by evening. All of us had decent riding experience except Poornima, who had only travelled pillion on bikes. She was going pillion with me in this trip, and I was initially a bit skeptical but knowing that she had done a trip to Ladhak as a pillion gave me the assurance that she would be fine to go through with this journey. She has otherwise been an avid backpacker and that helped see through things for her.

Bikes ready and riding gear checked we did our final checks on 6th night and hit the sack so that we could start early next day. Oh, I missed mentioning I rented a KTM Duke 200 from Indimotards. And Sushant was using a TVS Apache classic. I think I can add here that this was the same bike I attempted the saddle-sore on. Fondly called Kaira, the tried and trusted one.

November 7th, 2014

We managed to get up on time and were out and about by 5 in the morning, took the Tumkur Road to exit Bangalore. We did good time as early morning meant less local traffic. We stopped for breakfast at Chitradurg and also filled fuel there. Yes, the duke with just a 10 liter tank had a range of only 220 – 250 kms. The roads till Belgaum were good and most of it was part of the Golden Quadrilateral (GQ). We were averaging 100 – 110 kmph. We crossed Devengere, Hubli-Dharwad on the way. It would have been quite eventless and boring considering straight stretches of road, had it not been for the few ‘burnt ego’ car drivers who couldn’t digest the fact that we were going faster than them. This included a Jaguar XF and a couple of local Rossis’. We reached Belgaum by around 4 in the evening, took long considering the pace we were keeping. The culprit had been lack of sleep. We ended up taking a couple of nap breaks. Better safe than sorry.

Bangalore to Tarkarli via Swantwadi

From Belgaum the plan was to take the Swantwadi route via Amboli Ghats. We were expecting bad roads but with only 150kms left we were expecting to reach our destination soon. The whole stretch was a disaster. Potholes all over the place and the darkness setting in didn’t really help. The roads didn’t even allow us to enjoy the beautiful full moon rising in the sky. The loose gravel and rocks and flowing water at some places made it worse. It was thick jungles and not a place to even buy water in sight. It took us close to 4 hours to cross the ghats. With around 50 kms to destination we found a place to eat. It was already 8 in the night. I don’t know if it was the hunger or the food was genuinely good. It was probably the yummiest egg burjee and rotis I have had in my lifetime. Tummy’s full we geared up to finish the remaining 50kms. We got a call from Rajan and updated that we should be there in an hour or so. Everyone had reached the resort and we were the only ones left.

I couldn’t have been more wrong, if I may say so, to say that we would reach in an hour. You would see why I said that soon. We soon joined the NH 17 connecting Bombay to Goa. We were super glad to be on good roads again. Soon we reached Kudal and turned left towards our destination. Nice curvy winding roads. There were hardly any people or vehicles in sight. I just assumed that it’s probably because the location is remote. I had been following the Google Maps as now I did not have any network and thanks to offline maps I was able to at least follow the route.  At one point the Navigation tool asked us to turn left and behold there was no left. I was beginning to doubt the map’s credibility and called out for Sushant to stop and we checked the map on foot. To our surprise we found a Road Sign showing a left turn but no roads. All we could find was a mud stairs behind some bushes. We did not turn and headed straight thinking that we would come across another road. The Navigation rerouted and gave us new directions. The road started becoming narrower and suddenly we were in the middle of a small opening surrounded by bushes and the tool asked us to take a right. The opening to the right was not visible as it was a steep slope and had lot of gravel on the surface. Not having any choice we went down the trail hoping to reach a proper road after that. To our surprise we encountered a flight of clay/mud stairs, not having much of an option we rode down that and found ourselves in front of a dilapidated house. It was spooky. Thankfully there was a mud road leading away from the house and we ended up on a tarmac road. The joy was short lived as we found the road becoming narrower again and soon we were on a mud trail narrow enough for the bushes to hit our helmets. We could see the Karli River to our left, shimmering under the full moon. I could barely figure out what’s on my right after beyond the bushes. Technically we had not lost the way as the map showed us nearing our destination, but by now we figured that we had ended up taking a shorter but lesser used route.

I don’t know if it was the urge to reach our destination soon or the hunger for adventure we kept heading on via the mud trail. It was bumpy but both the duke and the apache were holding ground pretty well. We had to stop again as both our bikes splashed through a mud slush and our bikes were caked in red mud. The trail was becoming very difficult to ride on especially during the night. I checked the maps again, and found a small clearing of around 200 – 300 meters and then another road. We took our chances and headed that way and suddenly the trail opened on to some house’s back yard. And we had a surprised resident staring back at us. I just shouted out “Rosary Paradise”, our hotel, and he just pointed to a gap between two houses. He was too shocked to utter anything. Passing through the narrow passage and riding up a set of stairs we were back on a tarmac road and we were glad to see people and vehicles on it. Soon we were riding down the road, just eager to give our bums some rest. Finally, yes finally after 15 hours of riding we reached our destination. It was 10:30 in the night and our fellow nomads were just settling in for dinner. They were all a bit worried as to where we were as there was not contact and it had been over two hours since last contact. Pleasantries exchanged, all we needed to do was sleep. After a quick grub we hit the sack.

November 8th, 2014

Next day, while waiting for some fellow nomads to return from a dolphin sighting trip, I figured out what went wrong the previous night. It seems the actual road was the one that went all the way to Malavan and then you head south to Tarkarli.

Kudal to Tarkarli via Malavan

Google had shown us the shortest route, which was actually a mud trail.

Kudal to Tarkarli via offroad trail

On going over the route on Google Maps in earth mode I realized we were riding through a stretch which was in the middle of the river and the backwater canals. Lack of time prevented me from exploring that route in the day, but I would surely try it someday.

earthview_karli_river

The rest of the day went by with a group ride and lunch there on. We were around 28 of us and occupied the whole restaurant we stopped for food at.

The customary photo shoot was held at the beach in front of our hotel. That was a fun moment. And the boys went berserk after the shoot and went dragging on the hard sand beach. There were a couple of spills but still the fun factor was a 10/10.

the line up

During the evening we had sessions by a few of our veteran Nomads. Dr Sanket Kawli talked about Trauma Management, Navendu Singh gave us tips on Long Distance Riding and Vibhu Rishi & Rohit Parik gave us updates on what they have in mind regarding the goals and objectives of BikeNomads in the days to come.

It was a day well spent and it was great to connect a lot of names to faces. I had been in touch with most of them over forums but had never met most of them in person. All in all I would just say that this trip was worth it.

November 9th, 2014

The return journey had all six of us from Bangalore together. We left at 6AM and decided to take the Chorla – Khanapur route, as this was suggested as a better route. This time we went to Kudal via Malavan and headed south on the NH 17 towards Goa. We had planned to tank up in Goa due to the fuel prices there of course 😉 at just 55 bucks a litre.

Tanking up at Mapusa we headed towards Chorla Ghat. This was by far one of the best stretches of roads we had covered in the last two days. Lush green forests and scenic beauty at its best. Excellent, well maintained roads.Chorla Ghats

Then we turned towards Khanapur, knowing that the condition of roads is bad for around 20kms. We decided to take this route as the other okay road would take us on a longer route. The road wasn’t all that bad as it was being freshly laid. So it was level roads without potholes but were either clay or stone topped as the tar was yet to be laid. Our progress was slow but we made it through to Khanapur in around half an hour. From here we connected to the Dharwad highway (NH7) via Kittur.

Tarkarli to Bangalore via Chorla Ghats

Stopping for lunch and later for tea we reached Bangalore by around 7PM. The delays were mostly because of the traffic due to weekend rush.

This was my first BikeNomads AM and I loved every moment of it. I am proud of being part of such a group which has some of the most crazily sensible riders I have ever known.

click here for the BNAM2014 album

20 Reasons Why You Should Date A Biker !!!!!

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1) Date a guy who has ridden across the length and breadth of the Country. He’s the best storyteller you will ever meet.

2) Date a guy who will jump on his motorcycle and ride off in any direction, only to realign himself with this World once again. Respect him for this, because every time he is upset about something, he’ll make sure it doesn’t spill-over at work/home.And when he comes back, he’ll be more sorted than he was earlier.

3) Date a guy who knows how to fix a punctured tube. Or broken gear box.Chances are, he’ll be able to sort out a lot of problems in his own life as well as yours, if you’re close to him. Without taking external help. You can rely on him for most of your problems.Unless they’re medical in nature.In that case ,visit a doctor.(he ll take you to the doc on his motorcycle.)

4) Date a guy who is as comfortable spending a night at a gas station in the middle of nowhere as he is in the plush comfort of his house. Adaptability is something we as humans are kind of running short on these days.

5) Date a guy who will always , without fail, stop to help when he sees another one of his kind broken down on the road, For that matter , even if he sees car drivers. He understands what you’re going through at that moment.

6) Date a guy who gets excited at the mention of hitting the highway and riding off to the hills. The curves on those roads teach him how volatile life can be .In addition to that, he knows how to respect curves. of all kinds.( you know what i mean 😉 ).

7) Date a guy who can actually break each bone in another mans body who is looking for unnecessary trouble with him, with just a wrench. But he wont because he knows its not worth it and its not the solution to any problem. Yes , he respects everybody’s opinions. He wont force his on you. just make sure no one pushes him around too much.

8) Date a guy who will ride 300 km just to have that awesome breakfast that the road-side dinner offers in the town next to the one you’re in. If this isn’t adventurous enough for a mundane day, what else do you think is?

9) Date a guy who will get so excited before each ride that he wont be able to sleep for a minute, even though he has done this a million times. He knows how to keep things fresh. Always.

10) Date a guy who makes sure he packs in everything that he might and most probably will need on a long motorcycle ride. He pays attention to detail. Chances are he’ll be sorted in most of the things in his life.

11) Date a guy who never ever ride his machine without wearing a helmet. He knows his life is not just his own.

12) Date a guy who will pause and skip a few heartbeats every time he sees the Sun ride over the horizon, or comes across a waterfall at the next turn in the hills, or lays his eyes on the first snow-capped peaks in the ranges. He admires nature. The same nature you have chosen to ignore sitting in your cubicles.

13) Date a guy who will ride just for the heck of it, because it makes him feel free and liberated. Honestly he is more free than anyone else, because he turns that throttle, puts the bike in gears and grabs that freedom.

14) Date a guy who would rather be sitting on his motorcycle thinking about God, and not sit in a temple and think of his bike. He has his priorities in place.

15) Date a guy who has seen the dark side of motorcycling and has survived. He’ll give you tips and lessons you didn’t even know existed.

16) Date a guy who will go to any lengths to spend some quality time with his ”brothers”, even when there is no obvious blood connection. He understands brotherhood much more deeply.

17) Date a guy who can go wild on his motorcycle trips and can make everyone have a great time. with his music and his stories. What’s there not to like about this?

18) Date a guy who will look back at his life’s achievements and mistakes while riding his motorcycle. He will chuckle a bit, smile a lot, sometimes shed a tear or two. And that’s what builds character.

19) Date a guy who has crash and burns marks on his self. Warrior aren’t pretty. Barbie dolls are.

20) Date a guy who can keep his motorcycle like any other man would treat his wife. He’ll treat his wife like a queen……

Source – SAM

Bumblebee ~ Pulsar 200 NS ~ Calcutta to Jamshedpur

Bumblebee! That’s the first name that pops up in my head the moment I see the golden-yellow Pulsar 200 NS. The resemblance doesn’t end with the colour. If you look at the bike head on, the headlight looks very similar to the face of the Transformer’s character by the same name.

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I had been itching to test this offering from the Bajaj Auto team since it’s been launched. So, I pounced at the opportunity the moment my friend Talha, requested me to get his Pulsar 200 NS from Calcutta to Jamshedpur. His bike, which he christened as Zaira, had clocked around 3000 kms and just out of routine servicing when it got dropped at my end two days before the trip. I wanted to ride it around town to get used to the riding posture and also check the bike for any issues before the trip.

I have had a Pulsar 180 Classic, round head lights, steel rims, and the first model. I loved that bike a lot; however I was very disappointed with what Bajaj Auto had to offer all these years. When Bajaj launched the Pulsar 200 NS, I liked the fresh look and feel, however wasn’t really sure if the engine had much changes. On further probing found a lot of similarities between the 200 KTM Duke and the 200 NS. Even though the company officials might give you a twisted answer, we all could see where the lineage comes from.  This link got me interested, had the Bajaj Auto guys managed to find a way to offer the 200 Duke package in a cost-effective way. There is a difference of a little over 50K INR between the prices of the two.

Coming back on track, the first thing you would notice apart from the striking looks is the height of the bike. The rider seat is pretty high and I, at 5.8 feet, had just managed to keep both my feet on the ground while sitting on the bike. The seat is very comfy, both for the pillion and the rider. High seating is very similar to that of the Duke and also provides a good view of what’s ahead, especially in stop and go traffic. Really helps finding gaps to squeeze through. That brings me to the point of control. The upright seating and ergonomics make the bike very flick-able and cutting through traffic is a breeze. The bike is light weight at just 145 kgs, which is evident from a lot of fibre and plastics used for the cosmetics of the bike. It would also make it cheaper to replace in case of accidents.

Riding around Calcutta traffic was fun with good amount of torque at the twist of the throttle. Initially though I made the engine knock at low speeds, I noticed that the low-end torque was less compared to my regular bike. After some trial and error I found that the power delivery is evident post 4K on the RPM.  So, the trick was to keep the engine running above that to avoid knocks. The gear shifts are smooth, short and sweet. The clank and false neutrals of the primitive range of Pulsars’ are nowhere to be seen. Due to the traffic I really didn’t get the opportunity to open the throttle to get a feel of how fast it could go. That had to wait, till I hit the highways. I was still trying to figure where the 23.52 PS were hidden.

The digital meter console had the usual tell-tale lights and also a clock additionally. I found this a very useful feature. The ‘low fuel’ indicator is on the face scaring you to fill the tank with around 2 litres left in the tank. All the switch gears are highlighted with blue backlight, which makes it visible, even in the day. Apart from being functional, it sure is eye candy.

Till now the bike had kept me interested, with only a couple of things nagging me. The rear view mirrors are useless. It’s small, cumbersome to adjust for adequate rear view. In fact you can see everything, except the rear of the bike. The way it’s positioned, it’s honestly of no use. You have to adjust your head to get a hang of what’s behind you.  The tires … Bajaj Auto, I’m disappointed. I really wish you guys had given the MRF Revz at least. Sure, the tires are beefy at 100/80 -17 & 130/70 -17 at the front and the rear respectively. But it sure lacks the chipkoo feel of the Revz which come standard on the R15s. It’s like you have given the massive breaks to stop the bike, but what’s the use if you don’t have the tires to complement. ABS would have been a plus point in such cases though. I hope they at least add it as an option soon.

So, the next day I gear up and leave Calcutta at 4 AM. It’s dark and the head light is good, not great, mind you. It was good but not good enough. You can’t blame me when Bajaj has spoilt us with the projectors on the 220. I wonder why they chose to keep away from projectors on this offering.

The roads till Kharagpur (NH6) are amazing, part of the Golden Quadrilateral. I was trying to do this stretch of 130kms at the earliest to compensate on time that would be lost in the bad stretches beyond Kharagpur. The Pulsar 200 NS DID NOT let me down at all. It is a beast beyond 6K on the rpm. Cruising at 120kmph on the 6th gear, yes you read that right, this baby packs six gears to transfer all that power on to the wheels; So, cruising at 120kmph and you feel like overtaking something, there is no need to downshift, just twist the throttle and the surge you feel is exhilarating. I could now figure what they did with the triple spark plugs squeezed in the head of this engine. Each of them kicks in only when required. That, I believe, would also make it overall a more efficient engine. I obviously did not have any instruments to test the theory but the surge in power is evident at 4K & 6-7K on the RPM. It seems like the 2nd and the 3rd spark plugs kick in at these RPMs respectively. I had already touched 150kmph and it still felt like there is more to go. This beast is a hooligan and I was grinning all the way inside my helmet.

But Mother Nature had other plans, just 50kms away from Kharagpur and around 35 minutes from the starting point, I encountered heavy fog, speeds dropped to a mere 50kmph and by the time I was 35kmph from Kharagpur the fog was so thick that I had to stop. It was 5AM already, so waiting for the sun to rise was the best option.

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For people who know the route, the New Kolaghat Twin Bridge has been opened and now we no longer need to wait for the traffic jams to clear at the old bottle neck, the old rickety Kolaghat Bridge.

By 6AM I had crossed Kharagpur and left the Golden Quadrilateral heading to Baharagora, the border town between West Bengal & Jharkhand States. Now, it was time to test the Pulsar 200 NS’s competency on bad roads. The ground clearance was more than needed, at the only other time I have felt this comfy, on this stretch, on any other Indian bike is on a Bullet Classic 350. In that case it was a heavy bike and spring seats. Here, it was however a different story altogether. The suspension which felt adequately firm for high-speed cornering was doing an amazing job cushioning the potholes and the uneven roads. That combined with the comfy seats gave a combination which was soothing to my bums. I soon realised that I could actually manage good speeds even when there were practically no roads and I was happily going off-road to negotiate the pot holes. The standard MRF Eurogrip was great on loose gravel and I will surely add that slides & drifts were fun. I sure missed ABS a lot; I hope they will soon add it as an optional offer. In less than an hour I was across the border in Baharagora.

I surprisingly didn’t feel any fatigue, which I usually do, probably due to bad seats and a super firm ride, on my regular bike. I was still grinning at oodles of power and the trip was far from over. I still had 100 Kms of the worst roads on this route left. I was still able to keep an average of over 50kmph and I was mostly where the bike felt at home. Off Road! Keep the engine running over 3K on the RPM and the bike just takes off after every breaking. By the time I reached Jamshedpur at around 8:20AM I had done close to my fastest nonstop run yet on this route of 4 Hours 10 Minutes on my Yamaha R15v2. Please note that I was slow and standing for around half an hour due to the fog.

Over all I would say that the Pulsar 200 NS is an excellent buy at the south-side of a Lakh in INR. A bike with an amazing capability of handling whatever you throw at it. Be it smooth roads or the worst off-road possible. The Pulsar 200 NS will chew it and spit it out.

To sum it up, did the Bumblebee make me grin all the way from Calcutta to Jamshedpur? Hell Yeah!!!
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Zurina 6000km Memoir

Photo Credit: my close pals Indranil Mukherjee & Shovon Ray

12th of December 2011, I saw her bums for the first time and fell in love with her … a beauty in black and graphite winking at me as the twin headlights was being tested. I slowly walked up to her, touched her, turned the key and pushed the button. The engine purred into life and she was christened Zurina – the white shadow. The name was kind of oxymoronic for the black beauty.

The R15v2 is probably the best looking bike in India at the moment and there are no second thoughts about the same. Being a big fan of the iconic RX100, I had huge expectations from this one.

The moment you put your leg over the seat you would realize the most prominent thing about the bike. The tail is high. It is so high that an average height person would still end up scratching the pillion seats with his shoes. This was something I need to get used to. The seating position is such that the weight of the rider is onto the front of the bike. And like many would think, yes the body weight is mostly onto the palms of the rider. However I noticed that the seats are designed such that you are expected to sit further up on the seat, such that you touch the pillion seat. This is the most comfortable way you can sit on this bike. You would notice that the weight suddenly vanishes from the palms and you are seated almost hugging the tank and you are maneuvering the bike at a flick of your body weight.

One of the things I noticed, a change from the previous version, was that the low/mid end torque is more spread out and it’s a breeze to flick the bike around city traffic. This was my first full fairing bike, hence took me some time getting used to the size upfront.

Next I took the bike to lady friends of mine and boy did they love the bike, like I mentioned earlier, the looks are killer. Took them for a spin around town and she mentioned that she loved the high seating position as she could see what’s up front over my head. Not all ladies had the same opinion though, some were scared enough not to even give it a try. The pillion seat is not exactly comfortable and can be a pain in the bums especially in Kolkata where the roads are bad. I’m working on getting the seats redone to make it more comfy.  Seeking an opinion from my guy friends I took the bike to two of my guy friends, one a heavy 90+ kilo guy and the other with a medium stout build. Both of them loved the seating and what was surprising was that handling the bike with all that weight was still a breeze. Even in hard breaking the weight shift was manageable. Another thing I noticed was that most pillions were holding on to me, which is nice and cozy as long as the ladies are concerned, however it can be very tiring with their body weight slung on you. The solution was simple, asking the pillions to hold the tank with their palms, when going fast. At slow speeds all they need to do is take support from the riders’ shoulders.

The run in period was the most difficult … keeping the baby under 4K rpm in the first 1000 kms. It was just too tempting to twist the throttle and go for it … but of course at the possible risk of damaging the engine. I did a two-step run in process. The first 250kms I ran the engine with the usual 4 stroke mineral oil and then drained the oil and replaced it with the recommended synthetic oil. This was done to get rid of possible contaminants from the engine compartments. The bike handled well in those low speeds and the overall handling was confidence inspiring. The efficiency was what surprised me … it returned around 47kmpl which was a shock to me. I recalculated to make sure I got it right.

Noticeable issues I had with the bike till now were a few but something that cannot be ignored. The bike has no grab rail which scared the pillions at times. A centre stand would be greatly appreciated, especially for us DIY guys who love to get their hands dirty in oil and grim.  In fact a race stand could be an optional accessory we could get from the company showrooms. The rear tail assembly came loose, required a twist of the screws to set it right. The rear view mirrors are not that user-friendly to adjust. If you get the arms right and tighten them, it is still easy for a road side romeo to twist the mirrors for his narcissist pleasures. Another thing I noticed was that the tool box did not have a spanner to adjust the rear view mirror arms; I just bought one from my friendly diy store.

Time came for me to experience the bike on open roads. I was heading home to Jamshedpur from Kolkata; around 280Kms. Post the run in period this would the first time I was going to open her throttle up. 3:30AM I started from Kolkata and touched Kharagpur (130kms away) in just less than 1 hour 15 minutes. The headlights did a pretty good job, however being a nocturnal rider, I’d be upgrading soon to HIDs. On the speedometer it showed me the highest of 138kmph, where as the GPS registered 132kmph. There could be a slight margin of error here it seems. The bike handled well in straights and stuck to the ground with oodles of grip on the curves. Even under hard breaking, when a dog jumped in front, the bike stayed in control. So far, so good.

The challenge post Kharagpur was the stretch of bad roads all the way to Jamshedpur, another 150 odd kms. Around close to 60% of this stretch will put the surface of moon to shame. Craters, Red Dust, and if it rains Red Slush is what I call it. I wanted to see how well a bike designed for the track handles in such conditions. The ground clearance amazed me. I went half expecting a blow onto the engine cowl at some point or the other. The suspension, albeit on the stiffer end, behaved well and made handling the bike a pleasure. Bums did ache, however I was expecting worse. Due to this stretch I managed to reach Jamshedpur in 4 and a half hours, the fastest train on this stretch does it in 3hrs 55mins.

This was also the first time my mother saw the bike, and what is the first question she asks me? Do I get a stool to climb onto the pillion seat? On my return I did the same route in 4hours. I hope to beat the train one day.

The bike is also my daily commute to and fro my workplace, with a daily run of around 30 kms. The absence of a main stand did prick at times, but not much. She returned me a mileage within the range of 37 ~ 47kmpl, depending on the way and the conditions in which I rode. As always the bike was an eye candy, so much so that some jealous prick even scratched the tank with his key.

Today I complete 6000kms and I must say that Leader Yamaha in Kolkata is a lovely place to get your bike serviced in, with return times of less than 2hours; with a very able set of service technicians. I must add the performance of this bike makes up for every small issue I might have pointed out so far. Now the best part of my day is the time I spend riding her. GodSpeed!!!

My Life @ BikeNomads.com

on the way to dalma early morning

“The reflection of the rising sun on the handlebars is my alarm. My first cup of tea is miles away from my bed. I dont have a home. I carry my world with me. Boundaries have no meaning for me. I have no time to see the dust clouds in my mirror for the road ahead calls out to me. The wind is my partner. The sun is my compass. I dont stop in the rain, I sing with it. The evening birds match chords with my thump. The neon lights of the city become blurry lines as I enter the encroaching dark of the highway. The earth is my bed, the sky is my roof. I sleep to the music of the gurgling brook. I want no glory. I have no name. I dont have a begining, I dont have an end. I am a BIKENOMAD!”

– written by a fellow Nomad …

BIKENOMADS